Family Life: Just One Thing

Are you realizing that SOMETHING JUST NEEDS TO CHANGE… but you’re struggling to set just one or two goals to work on with your family?

We hear you! It’s totally normal.

We know how to get you out of the overwhelm.

You need to do JUST ONE THING. TODAY.

When you deep dive into just one step, you can get on track to see some real progress.

Let’s dig into some examples…

In our examples today, we’ll focus on social skills and emotions.

For SOCIAL SKILLS, TRY this one

  • Carefully consider your child’s interests. Then, think about your child’s peers to identify one peer with a common interest.

For EMOTIONS, TRY this one

  • Listen to your child. Don’t dismiss or correct what he or she is saying. Help them feel heard by echoing the sentiment and asking what else. After your child has shared everything you think they have to say, try to get across the sentiment that “I’m here, and things can get better.”

We’re here to help…

Sometimes parents tell us “this is overwhelming” or “I just need one or two things to try right now.” We get it!

We know the simple, step-by-step strategies you can take to get started in helping your child. And we are here to guide you along the way.

Through our platform, you can choose a very specific symptom to target.

Now, LET’S LOOK A LITTLE DEEPER into those general steps to try if you are worried about your child’s social skills or emotions.

Social Skills

Just one thing: Consider your child’s interests carefully. Then, think about your child’s peers to identify one peer with a common interest. 

Collaborate with your child on this, if possible. Is there at least one peer who shares a common interest with your child? If so, think about some potential settings where they may be able to get together 1:1 to enjoy that interest. In the age of social distancing, this may be tricky to set up; however you can start now by doing the homework to find that potential friend with a common interest. You can coach your child by saying, “You really like cars. If you met another friend who likes cars, what could you ask them?” In this way, you are establishing the foundation for a social conversation and the establishing of common interests with peers. 

Emotions

Just one thing: Listen to your child. Don’t dismiss or correct what he or she is saying. Help them feel heard by echoing the sentiment and asking what else. After your child has shared everything you think he or she has to say, try to get across the sentiment that “things can get better” and “I’m here and things can get better.” 

Remember that anxiety or depression in a child can manifest as irritability and grouchiness so your child may not be obviously sad or anxious. Look for changes: poorer hygiene, more time at home, quieter, interested in being alone in the bedroom, weight loss or gain. Your child needs to see you as an ally and sounding board and then you can provide the best support.

Contact us today to learn more! And remember, take a deep breath, and try just one thing!